UTSOA

The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture

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Dual Degree Programs

CRP offers five dual degrees in partnership with other Graduate Programs giving students an opportunity to supplement their planning degree with additional knowledge, skills and expertise.

CRP Dual Degrees: Latin American Studies | School of Law | LBJ School of Public Affairs | Sustainable Design | Urban Design

Dual Degree Admissions

To apply for admission to a dual degree program, an applicant must select the correct dual degree on the ApplyTexas application, follow the application instructions for each degree program, and meet all application deadlines for each degree program.

If an applicant is not admitted to the dual degree program, s/he may be offered admission to an individual degree program.

CRP/ Latin American Studies: Dual MSCRP/MA Degree Program

Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning
(M.S.C.R.P.), School of Architecture +
Master of Arts in Latin American Studies (M.A.),
Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

The program in Community and Regional Planning offers a unique dual degree program with the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies (LLILAS). The program leads to the simultaneous award of the Master of Arts in Latin American Studies and the Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning. Students learn the fundamental technical and conceptual skills necessary to effectively address planning issues, while also studying the cultural, socioeconomic and geographic challenges and opportunities characteristic of the region.

LLILAS affords students the opportunity to research many facets of the contemporary Latin American situation through its interdisciplinary approach to the study of the region. The program combines study in the fields of anthropology, economics, geography, government, and sociology as well as community and regional planning. CRP provides students with the skills necessary for working in community and regional development in Latin America, whether through the public, private, or nonprofit sector, and to address the urbanization and development issues at the forefront of contemporary policy concerns in Latin America.

The joint program offers research, internship and service learning opportunities in Latin America through CRP and LAS coursework, formal programs, and informal engagements with faculty projects.

Program Structure

The joint program is structured so that students admitted can earn a Master of Arts in Latin American Studies and a Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning degree simultaneously in three academic years. It is recognized, however, that some students may find it necessary to enroll for an additional semester or summer session in order to complete all requirements of the joint program.

A student must apply for admission to both the dual degree program in CRP and Latin American Studies (Dual Degree Code 6-59801). A student currently enrolled in Latin American Studies program or the CRP program may apply for admission to the dual degree program.

If a student is not admitted to the dual degree program, s/he may be offered admission to the MA program in Latin American Studies (Degree Code 6-59800) or the MSCRP program (Degree Code 6-25400).

All course requirements of both programs must be met, except that each school retains the option to waive or replace any of its required courses with the approval of the dual degree coordinators, Graduate Advisers, and appropriate graduate faculty.

The student will write a professional report or master's thesis during the third year of the joint program. The report will be supervised by a minimum of two faculty members, one from each program. One faculty member will serve as Chair and the second as Reader.

soa.utexas.edu/crp/crpla/lapeople

www.utexas.edu/cola/insts/llilas/

CRP Dual Degrees: Latin American Studies | School of Law | LBJ School of Public Affairs | Sustainable Design | Urban Design

 

CRP/ School of Law: Dual MSCRP/JD Degree Program

Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning and
(Doctor of Jurisprudence (MSCRP/JD) Dual Degree Program
DThe University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture and School of Law

I. Description and Purpose of the Program

The University of Texas at Austin offers a dual degree program leading to the simultaneous award of a Doctor of Jurisprudence (JD) degree and a Master of Science degree in Community and Regional Planning (MSCRP), School of Architecture. Students enrolled in the dual degree program may receive the J.D. and MSCRP degrees in four years rather than in five years as is ordinarily required by the two programs independently.

The proposed program draws upon the resources of the two curricula with a view to developing professionals capable of dealing with both the legal and planning aspects of urban and regional policy problems. The dual degree program is designed to prepare for a variety of professional roles in which knowledge of planning methodology and process, coupled with the analytic skills and professional expertise of lawyers, are essential. These may include private practitioners in law and planning; administrators and staff of public agencies and consulting firms in the fields of planning, housing, environmental protection; research analysts; staff members of governmental commissions and agencies; and executive assistants to elected and appointed officials.

The University of Texas at Austin is well positioned to offer a high qualify program of this nature. The School of Law has long been considered to have one of the best faculties in the nation. It has distinguished professors interested in Environmental Law, Property, Constitutional Law, Alternative Dispute Resolution and other topics relevant to urban and regional policy issues. Professors in the Graduate Program in Community and Regional Planning faculty are recognized nationwide for their scholarship and teaching. Students will have access to extraordinary library resources. The Tarlton Law Library is the fifth largest academic library in the United States and has strong government, land use and environmental law holdings. The Public Affairs, Perry-Castaneda, and Architecture and Planning Libraries provide strong coverage for all aspects of community and regional planning. The Center for Public Policy Dispute Resolution provides a forum for faculty from both academic units to collaborate in the study and resolution of conflict at community and regional levels.

II. Program Structure and Requirements

Both degrees are awarded simultaneously upon completion of all requirements of the dual program. Therefore, students should arrange their course schedules so that the requirements for both degree programs are completed in the same semester.

Admission Requirements:

To enter this program, students must apply separately to both the Law School and the graduate program in Community and Regional Planning and must be accepted independently by both. Students must plan ahead and have completed the GRE and LSAT tests so that test scores are available by respective admission deadlines of each school.

A prospective dual degree student may apply in two ways. First, the candidate can apply to the Law and CRP programs simultaneously. Alternatively, during the student's first year of Law School or first year in the CRP program (and prior to applicable deadlines), the student can apply for admission to the dual degree program.

Dual Degree Requirements:

A minimum of 110 credit hours must be completed to receive the dual degrees: 80 credit hours must be completed in Law School coursework and 30 credit hours completed in Planning. Six of the Planning credit hours of the student's area of specialization apply toward the completion of the 86 credit hour minimum for the award of the J.D. degree; and 18 credit hours of the student's Law School coursework applicable to the student's area of specialization apply toward the completion of the 48 hour minimum for the award of the MSCRP degree.

Community and Regional Planning Requirements:

Students must complete a total of 30 hours of Planning course work, including the MSCRP core curriculum and a professional report in Community and Regional Planning. As previously noted, 18 credit hours of the student's Law School course work applicable to the student's area of specialization will apply toward the completion of the 48 hour minimum for the award of the MSCRP degree. Students may choose to take a course in alternative dispute resolution (for Law School credit) to satisfy the CRP core requirements for Participatory Planning. Students may also choose to take CRP 381 (Planning Law) for Law School credit.

Students in the dual degree program must complete a professional report in the final year of study that makes full use of the combined degree education. The professional report must be read and approved by a supervising professor (from CRP) and at least one second reader (from either school). Except as set forth above, all degree requirements applicable to students of the Community and Regional Planning degree program apply to students in the dual degree program.

Law School Requirements:

All Law School requirements applicable to students in the normal JD program must be satisfied. The JD degree normally requires 86 total units. For dual degree students in the JD/MSCRP program, six of the 86 total credit hours for the award of the JD degree shall be completed in Community and Regional Planning. The remaining balance of 80 credits must be taken in the Law School.

Students must complete the entire first year Law curriculum in their first year at the Law School. The Law School's first-year curriculum includes six one-semester four-unit substantive law courses: Civil Procedure, Constitutional Law I, Contracts, Criminal Law, Property, and Torts. One of these six courses will include a writing component, which adds a unit of credit to the course. The rest of the first-year curriculum includes two semesters of Legal Research and Writing (two units of credit per semester) and an optional elective course of 2-3 units in the spring semester. The first year program in the Law School usually totals 29 units of credit.

Students must also complete the Law School's upper-class curriculum that includes the following requirements: Professional Responsibility, Constitutional Law II, a writing seminar, and a Professional Skills course.

Four-Year Course of Study: An Example

FIRST YEAR (30 HOURS)

· Law courses (30 hours, all required first-year courses)

* 5-hour courses contain a writing component

SECOND YEAR (27 HOURS)

Planning courses (12 hours)

Law courses (15 hours)

THIRD YEAR (27 hours)

Planning Courses (12 hours)

Law Courses (15 hours)

FOURTH YEAR (27 hours)

Planning Courses (6 hours)

Law Courses (20 hours)

CRP Dual Degrees: Latin American Studies | School of Law | LBJ School of Public Affairs | Sustainable Design | Urban Design

 

CRP/LBJ School of Public Affairs- Dual MSCRP/MPAFF Degree Program

Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning
(M.S.C.R.P.), School of Architecture +
Master of Public Affairs (M.P.Aff.), Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs

The Community and Regional Planning Program of the School of Architecture and Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs offer a dual degree program leading to the Master of Community and Regional Planning (MSCRP) and the Master of Public Affairs (MPAff). Many leadership positions in government and the nonprofit sector demand both knowledge of substantive community and regional planning issues and innovative approaches to policy analysis development and public management.

The program is structured so that students earn both Masters' degrees simultaneously in three years instead of four by eliminating duplicative course work in certain analytic areas and in general electives.

Program Structure

Public Affairs

Community and Regional Planning

Students must apply to the Graduate School of the University of Texas for admission to the Dual MPAff and MSCRP programs. The admission process includes completion of the GRE examination, transcripts, and an admission form. Applicants must submit materials to each School (LBJ and Architecture) and be accepted by each School's admissions committee.

A student may apply to the dual degree program after having been admitted to either the MPAff. or MSCRP program, as long as the student has not yet matriculated from either program. The decision to accept a dual degree applicant will be jointly made by both schools' admission committees. Students in the dual degree program may, at any time, request a change of major from the dual degree program to either the MPAff or the MSCRP program. Students who exercise this option may not reenter the dual degree program.

*If the first reader of a student's Professional Report is an LBJ faculty member, this counts as 3 credit hours in the LBJ Public Affairs component. If the first reader is a CRP faculty member this counts as 3 credit hours in the CRP component.

**If a student takes PA 391-Public Financial Management, they must take 3 extra hours of elective credits in CRP. If they take CRP 381-Financing Public Services, they must take 3 extra hours of elective credits in LBJ-Public Affairs

www.utexas.edu/lbj/degreeprograms/crp.php

www.utexas.edu/lbj/index.php

CRP Dual Degrees: Latin American Studies | School of Law | LBJ School of Public Affairs | Sustainable Design | Urban Design

 

CRP/Sustainable Design: Dual MSCRP/MSSD Degree Program

Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning (M.S.C.R.P.), School of Architecture + Master of Science in Sustainable Design (M.S.S.D), School of Architecture

The Graduate Program in Community and Regional Planning and the Graduate Program in Sustainable Design offer a coordinated dual degree program. The coordinated program leads to the award of the Master of Science in Sustainable Design (MSSD) and the Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning (MSCRP). Students learn the fundamental technical and conceptual skills necessary to effectively address planning issues, while also studying the natural systems, building systems, and cultural systems required to achieve sustainable urban development.

The Coordinated Program offers research, internship and service learning opportunities through coursework in Community and Regional Planning as well as Architecture, formal programs, and informal engagements with faculty projects. Opportunities are increasing for graduates with specific skills to address the pressing problems associated with the environmental and social aspects of continued growth in our built environment. Students who can combine planning skills with a deep understanding of sustainable design principles and practices are in high demand in both the private and public sector as interdisciplinary teams address the challenges of sustainable development at the level of building sites, neighborhoods and metropolitan regions. The unique set of skills provided by this new dual degree program will be an important addition to the graduate offerings at The University of Texas at Austin.

Program Structure

The Coordinated Program is structured so that students admitted can earn a Master of Science in Sustainable Design and a Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning degree in three academic years. A student must apply for admission to both programs. Application to the second program can be made concurrently with the first program, or during the first year of enrollment in the first program. The application procedure during the first year of enrollment follows the same general procedure as for new applicants.

All course requirements of both programs must be met, except that each program retains the option to waive or replace any of its required courses with the approval of the Coordinated Program Directors, and appropriate graduate faculty.

Students must complete 30 credit hours in Community and Regional Planning, and 30 credit hours in Sustainable Design, and a 6 credit hour joint advanced research project for a 66 credit hours total.

Students are required to complete the joint advanced research project in the form of either a thesis or a combination of master's project and master's report so as to meet the requirements of both programs. The thesis or project and report must be read and approved by a supervising professor and a second reader. The supervising professor may be chosen from either CRP or MSSD; and the second reader must represent the other program.

Community and Regional Planning (MsCRP)

Sustainable Design (MSSD)

*Of the 6 credit hour thesis of combination project or report, 3 credit hours will count toward the CRP requirements and 3 credit hours will count toward the MSSD requirements.

www.soa.utexas.edu/sustainabledesign/curriculum

soa.utexas.edu/sustainabledesign/admissions

CRP Dual Degrees: Latin American Studies | School of Law | LBJ School of Public Affairs | Sustainable Design | Urban Design

 

CRP/Urban Design: Dual MSCRP/MSUD Degree Program

Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning
(M.S.C.R.P.), School of Architecture +
Masters of Science in Urban Design (M.S.U.D), School of Architecture

The Graduate Program in Community and Regional Planning and the Graduate Program in Urban Design offer a coordinated dual degree program. The coordinated program leads to the award of the Master of Science in Urban Design (MSUD) and the Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning (MSCRP). The Graduate Program in Urban Design, along with the Graduate Program in Community and Regional Planning offer a dual-degree option which gives students an opportunity to supplement their planning degree with additional expertise in physical planning and the design of urban areas. The dual-degree program leading to master's degrees in both Urban Design and Community and Regional Planning can be completed in a total of three years. While available for any student undertaking either degree program, this particular dual-degree program is primarily structured as a vehicle for students interested in urban design who do not have either the design background or professional degree credentials necessary to establish themselves professionally. The program combines the advanced studies necessary to effectively address planning issues, while also providing students with an opportunity to supplement their planning degree with additional expertise in physical planning and the design of urban areas.

The Coordinated Program offers research, internship and service learning opportunities through coursework in Community and Regional Planning as well as Architecture, formal programs, and informal engagements with faculty projects.

Opportunities are increasing rapidly for graduates with specific skills who can combine urban policy planning with an in-depth understanding of the design of physical environments. Graduates with expertise these areas are in more and more demand from prospective employers in government, private industry, and the non-profit sectors. The University of Texas at Austin has a long history of academic excellence in both planning and urban design. Building on that experience, the School of Architecture's new MSUD/MSCRP program combines these strengths to not only provide the urban policy expertise required to plan cities, but also the design proficiency required to help shape the construction of the future city in order to create sustainable and livable places. The unique set of skills provided by this new dual degree program will be an important addition to the graduate offerings at The University of Texas at Austin.

Program Structure

Students must complete 36 credit hours in Community and Regional Planning and 30 credit hours in Urban Design, including a closely coordinated 6 credit hour Master's Design Study in Urban Design and a 3 credit hour Professional Report in Community and Regional Planning. The combined MDS and PR must be each read and approved by a supervising professor and a second reader. The supervising professor may be chosen from either MSCRP or MSUD. The second reader must represent the other program.

Community and Regional Planning (MSCRP)

Urban Design (MSUD)

TOTAL

CRP Dual Degrees: Latin American Studies | School of Law | LBJ School of Public Affairs | Sustainable Design | Urban Design

 

CRP Dual Degree Admissions

In order to enroll in a dual degree program, students must gain admittance by both programs of interest. It is recommended that prospective students review the detailed requirements the dual degree they are interested in above and then contact the relevant program director:

Dual Degrees within the School of Architecture

CRP+Sustainable Design, CRP+Urban Design

Elizabeth Mueller, Graduate Adviser
Email: CRP-Advisor@austin.utexas.edu

Tomi Yamamoto, Graduate Admissions and Scholarship Coordinator
Email: soa_grad@austin.utexas.edu

 

Dual Degrees in Partnership with other UT Schools

CRP+Latin American Studies, in partnership with the Teresa Long Institute of Latin American Studies (Llilas)

CRP+Law, in partnership with the UT School of Law

CRP+Public Affairs, in partnership with the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs