December, 2003
ISBN:
0-93451-04-7

Editor

Assistant Editors

Chrisitine Wong
Tim Walker

Table of Contents 

Introduction by Kevin Alter

Architects have long had a love/hate relationship with style. In our efforts to design buildings with a sense of integrity and to produce timeless artifacts, concerns of stylishness are often pushed aside. Perhaps our ambiguous feelings in this regard come as a consequence of the modernist reaction against art and architectural history typically taught as a succession of period types. . . .

After Thirty Years of Silence by Morris Lapidus

I am an architect approaching my ninety-eighth birthday. This has been my career for seventy-seven years. Upon graduating from high school, I enrolled in New York University to study drama. . . . I had earned enough credits at NYU to allow me to enter the Graduate School of Architecture at Columbia. I fell in love with architecture there. . . .

Inspiration From Unlikely Sources by Todd Oldham

For me, the most important aspect of creativity is finding inspiration in unlikely places. I was amazed and very happy to be invited to participate in an architectural publication. As a child, architecture was the only thing beside graphic design that I knew I wanted to do. . . .

Studio Sofield by William Sofield

As a designer, I don't start with preconceived notions of what anything should be. In The Unsinkable Molly Brown, Debbie Reynolds' favourite color is red. In the gilded age palace that she's created, the carpet is red, the walls are red, all the furniture is red. She comes down the grand staircase very pleased with herself wearing a big red dress. One snooty society lady who's come to see the place turns to the other and says, "Well, it's all very nice, but could use a touch of red." I guess if she likes red, then that's as valid a starting point as any. . . .

Building Style by Stanley Marcus

My architectural education began in 1935 when I commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design a home. One could argue that my experience with Mr. Wright in that context earned me the equivalent of a Ph.D. We never built the building, but the education stuck. . . .

Perpetual Motion by Herbert Enns

The Trojan Horse is useful as a metaphor for critical speculation, involving an object that is not really what it appears to be on initial impression. In archtiecture and industrial design, the object (and its various attendant historical, theoretical, technical, etc. masks) embodies ideals and values. Objects are necessarily self-serving and self-referential....A discussion of the Airstream trailer as a Trojan Horse moving through contemporary culture allows for a reverse flow of thought, argument, and proposition. . . .

A Moment in Time by Tom Ford

I attended the undergraduate architecture department (Environmental Design) at Parsons School of Design in New York City. Their program was a mixture of architecture, furniture design, and interior design and was meant to be an undergraduate course from which you would go on to a real architecture school. . . .

A Room of One's Own by Joseph Holtzman

Empty rooms are already perfect in their empty way; to add anything meaningful to them is difficult. Decorated rooms, on the other hand, even good and interesting ones, remain problematic. . .

Part Two - Midnight at the Oasis: What Happens When Good Architecture Becomes Fashionable by Ira Smith

VIII. Showtime

Act I: Morgans quot;I don't sell sleep. I sell magic, " Ian Schrager said about his boutique hotels. Half-pitch, half-play, Schrager's declaration points out that for him, and for his designers, magic is a product. . . .

13th volume of CAAD's Center series

CENTER 13: Pressing Style  cover