Today's Reviews Include: 

Advanced Studio Simon Atkinson
Architecture - Design V John Blood
Vertical Studio  Charles DiPiazza
Comprehensive Studio Michael Garrison
Interior Design - Design III Allison Gaskins
Landscape Architecture - Studio I Hope Hasbrouck
Advanced Studio David Heymann
Community & Regional Planning: GIS Alex Karner
Advanced Studio Rasa Navasaityte
Advanced Studio Igor Siddiqui
Vertical Studio  Morgan Slusarek
Architecture - Design V Vince Snyder

 

Links to watch the live-stream will be added to this page at 10:00 a.m., once the review has begun. Each review will be broken up into three sessions:

  • 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
  • 12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
  • 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

 

Advanced Studio 

Instructor: Simon Atkinson

The description for this studio is forthcoming

 

Architecture: Design V - Analog Architecture in the Anthropocene

Instructor: John Blood

In this studio, we will explore extreme sites on earth that are analogous to future sites that we anticipate engaging more generally on earth due to environmental and climate change. Since the beginning of space exploration, NASA and other agencies have used terrestrial analog missions on earth to simulate the conditions on other planets. By addressing conditions on earth that are analogous to those found on other planets, scientists are able to simulate their missions in these environments, hence reducing the risks of the actual missions while increasing their chances of success. As we hasten toward dramatic human-caused climate change on earth it is, in part, the role of the architect to work toward architectures of resiliency that can both mitigate climate change and provide architectures that adapt to these changes.

This studio proposes that contemporary analog sites can be predictive of more common future conditions on earth. Similar to how scientists have selected space analog sites underwater, in deserts, and at polar regions, earth analogs could also be situated in select sites that are analogous to increased desertification, ocean level rise, increased flooding, loss of glaciers, changes in flora and fauna, and other locations that share similarities to future widespread environmental changes. The final project for this studio will entail the design of an earth analog environment for the Anthropocene. 

 

 

Vertical Studio - Bottom Up Urbanism

Instructor: Charles DiPiazza

The primary pedagogical agenda for this studio is to enable students to acquire an understanding of the interwoven relationship between form, space, structure, and materiality. The main project will harness this subject matter to include the fundamental parameters of site and program. The site is the Brackenridge Tract in Austin, Texas. The program calls for new courtyard housing that will increase the current density. The testing ground for this effort will be the site of the Colorado Apartments located at 2501 Lake Austin Blvd, in an area that is highly desirable – the gently sloping space between Lake Austin Blvd and Lady Bird Lake. The studio seeks to ‘urbanize’ this area adopting a courtyard typology that will treat the ‘solid’ (building) and ‘void’ (public square, private patios) as a singular mutually-dependent design as a way of (re)asserting the primacy of architecture’s potential to creating a ‘realm’ or ‘precinct’ rather than simply an isolated container of artificial environments and/or area of restricted access.

The studio will embrace a climate of critical thought towards traditional and orthodox modernist architectural and urban ideas. By virtue of this, students will discover that a “correct” solution will not consist of employing an idea/concept that has already been established – the purpose of the studio is not simply to introduce the student to already established trends for intervening in the city.

 

Comprehensive Studio

INSTRUCTOR: Michael Garrison

In this studio, students are asked to design a new a Phase 3 design for the Blue Hole Regional Park in Wimberley, Texas. The program for the park upgrade includes a 16,500 square foot Aquatic Center, 7,000 square foot open-air pavilion, a 1.2- acre pool, a 500,000-gallon water storage facility, and a 75,000-gpd wastewater treatment facility.

Architecture engages in a continual dialogue with its environment, and water is one of the basic elements of that dialogue. As the mediator between natural and constructed forms, architecture can play a significant role in shaping our experience of water. Part of the fascination of water for architects is that its essential qualities – fluid, dynamic, translucent – are similar to the most advanced and challenging architectural concepts architects are currently exploring. The key to understanding the architecture of water is to understand the water of architecture: the physical laws which govern its behavior, the ways in which it engages our senses, how its presence relates to us as human beings. The tension between architecture and water can provide the constraints and limitations through which imaginative architecture occurs.

 

Interior Design: Design II - Memory Palace

Instructor: Allison Gaskins

The application of the conceptual process and programming tools explored in the first half of the semester will be dedicated to the creation of a vertical “memory palace”, or rephrased similarly, a center for global cultures and individualism. We will seek to examine relative notions of proximity that the interior promotes as primary principles of design. Therefore, we will closely examine established definitions of envelope, threshold, boundary, enclosure, connection, origin, and destination. We will question the definitions and respond with interventions in the built environment. We will question our sources of inspiration and seek anew, from cultural origins found in eastern, western, and other philosophies as well as global folklore and legend.

We will perpetually inhabit the interior, although all other bets are off. Gravity will be questioned. Standards, proportions, and codes will be re-examined. Absurdities will be introduced without bias. Our goal this semester is to reestablish the mundane; the everyday; the banal. Perhaps, even, we will produce proposals of normalcy. Through an objective examination of our design instincts, we will work to articulate our intentions. The attributes of the design fundamentals employed will be the guiding principles of design. Ultimately, the studio's role is to question, inspire, and enhance the power of the interior through the design process.

 

Landscape Architecture - Studio I

Instructor: Hope Hasbrouck

The studio will resolve three projects that engage the formation of landscape architectural space. The early projects explore form and appearance through exercises addressing composition, operation, organizational structure, and the shaping of volumes essential to the landscape architectural experience. The latter projects engage the complexities associated with a geographical location where students reconcile form and appearance with landscape process and action.

 

Advanced Studio - Hot, Humid, and Absolute: A School in Sri Lanka

Instructor: David Heymann

This studio investigates the potential of the relationship between sustainable design strategies – in this case, for a hot/humid climate – and absolute architectural geometries in the consideration of future institutional public space, in this case, that of an educational facility. Students must grapple with the potentials and difficulties of systematic, absolute geometries not only for these advantages but also for the potential of generating a rich and consequent public space, a relationship as old as architecture.

The major project for this studio – an educational facility for a specific urban site in Sri Lanka – asks the designer to relate the geometries of the proposed form to a historical and embedded history and trajectory of architecture in Sri Lanka — and more specifically that of the work of Geoffrey Bawa – one that is tied up in the complex and problematic history of colonialism and Modernism. This complicates the design undertaking, yet students are required to develop a clear stance not only on that history but on how systematic architectures can address these deeply cultural rather than technical dilemmas.

 

 

Community & Regional Planning - Geographic Information Systems

Alex Karner

Planners operate over space and time, helping residents and decision-makers understand how current actions will affect future outcomes. Effectively communicating the results of planning analyses requires practitioners to create arresting and informative visuals that clearly transmit key ideas, concepts, and tradeoffs. Geographic information systems (GIS) capable of producing maps and analyzing spatial data are indispensable for planning-related analyses and must form an essential component of the planner’s software toolkit.

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to visual communication techniques and technologies through the lens of GIS. The knowledge students gain will help them master different methods for visually communicating information. Because of the dominance of the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) in the GIS space, much of the instruction will focus on their flagship ArcGIS Desktop products. We will also cover their newer offering--ArcGIS Pro. Other options also exist and students will get some exposure to them. Most implement similar GIS principles in different ways, so it is the hope that the skills students acquire will allow them to move fluidly between different GIS flavors with little difficulty.

 

Advanced Studio - Parts-to-Parks: Figurating Urban Densities

Instructor: Rasa Navasaityte

Dense cities are the best and simplest response towards a sustainable and vibrant living environment. This year, public, urban life has shifted into the private sphere. It requires proactivity to re-architect how a city provides free space. Future architecture requires more diversity of public, semi-public, and quarter-private, beyond the scale of assemblies, a whole range of grains for small groups and for individuals. Cities pro-actively promote, incent, and foster green space. However, cities beyond a specific density can just add a green roof, terrace, or balcony to their existing building masses. Austin is one of the greenest cities to the number of its inhabitants, simply because it is not densely urbanized. Can we build denser buildings with an equal share of green space? Can Austin become the first city that is green and dense, that is green and affordable because it needs less material, energy, or infrastructure

Parallel to the rise of the sharing economy, real-time design shifts from functional assignments and space as containing assets towards participatory performance. Here, continuity translates to the possibilities of exchange and interaction by merging geometry with autonomous behavior through simulation techniques. In contrast to the additive and subsequent steps of modernistic design, differentiating in additive steps between drawing, planning, building, living, we will design real-time, simulated, but integrated. We will arrange, construct, layer, nest, group living, housing, working, walking, dining, trading, by shifting, sharing, and merging spatialities.

 

Advanced Design Studio - Time Capsule 2020

Instructor: Igor Siddiqui

We live in a time when the extraordinary is routinely becoming ordinary, and what may have once seemed unprecedented can now occur daily. This observation is inclusive; it takes into account climate change, rapid advancements of technology, public health, social unrest, politics, and all else that is in flux. Meanwhile, to future generations looking at our present as their past, what has come to be ordinary to us (captured popularly by the flawed term ‘the new normal’) may yet again appear as extraordinary. Indeed, a minor document of life in one era can provide numerous clues to another generation. A personal artifact, for example, seemingly insignificant at one time may be capable of telling a collective story at another time. This, in many ways, is the ambition of time capsules—containers filled with remnants of material culture, recorded information, transcribed rituals, and otherwise represented knowledge to be discovered by future generations.

This studio focuses on the construct of the time capsule as a framework for exploring architecture’s capacity to capture the present moment, while also serving as a tool for projection into the future. The main project for the semester is a 50,000 SF building serving as a foil for exploring the notion of the time capsule at the scale of architecture. Central to the design process is the development of program, selection of site as a multifaceted context, and the invention of a visual and narrative language suited to the conceptual underpinnings of each project.

 

Vertical Studio - Movement / Pause

Instructor: Morgan Slusarek

So often as students in school, and even in practice, we take the movement of our bodies and the movement of our potential users’ bodies for granted. The movement of the human body is dynamic, but this type of action list is actually a very narrow concept of what the human body can do and, indeed, does do on a daily basis to emote in and absorb the world around it. Our bodies have tremendous power over us.

In this studio, as a means of digging into the art of movement and pause, and not taking it for granted in our design work, we will be looking at what modern dance and ballet can teach us. Students' final project will be a ballet school for adolescents who aspire to be a member of a professional company. Many dancers, when asked, say they dance for the freedom it gives them. Designing this school will require us to draw on the knowledge gained in the first part of the semester, and couple it with an aspirational intention of our own. Dancers use their bodies to express themselves and perform. Architects work predominantly with things external to themselves. As such, our critical tools as designers (structure, material, and light) will be very important for this final project

 

Architecture: Design V - Analog Architecture in the Anthropocene

vince snyder

In this studio, we will explore extreme sites on earth that are analogous to future sites that we anticipate engaging more generally on earth due to environmental and climate change. Since the beginning of space exploration, NASA and other agencies have used terrestrial analog missions on earth to simulate the conditions on other planets. By addressing conditions on earth that are analogous to those found on other planets, scientists are able to simulate their missions in these environments, hence reducing the risks of the actual missions while increasing their chances of success. As we hasten toward dramatic human-caused climate change on earth it is, in part, the role of the architect to work toward architectures of resiliency that can both mitigate climate change and provide architectures that adapt to these changes.

This studio proposes that contemporary analog sites can be predictive of more common future conditions on earth. Similar to how scientists have selected space analog sites underwater, in deserts, and at polar regions, earth analogs could also be situated in select sites that are analogous to increased desertification, ocean level rise, increased flooding, loss of glaciers, changes in flora and fauna, and other locations that share similarities to future widespread environmental changes. The final project for this studio will entail the design of an earth analog environment for the Anthropocene. 

 

*All listed studio descriptions are subject to change